Microworlds Lab Workshops

Ledgers

Tom Robisheaux

2018

Type: Lab

The Microworlds Lab hosted a series of workshops focused on a microhistorical topic or method, or a related topic. Presenters included Duke faculty members, students, and staff, as well as guests from outside the university. A Q&A rounded out each workshop, where attendees were encouraged to bring examples and questions from their own research projects to discuss.

For a full listing of events with descriptions, visit the Microworlds Lab website.

Spring 2020

  • Digital Scholarship Workshop I: Managing Archival Materials as Data
  • Doing History: Analyzing Primary Sources
  • Material Objects, Their Meanings & the People Drawn to Them: A MicroWorlds Workshop: Actor-Network Theory

Fall 2019

  • The Paris 1572 Project: Collaborative Research in the History Classroom
  • Emotional Breakdown: A Collaborative Workshop on Analyzing Emotions within Your Research

Spring 2019

  • Emotions, Religious Experience, & the Emergence of Psychiatric Medicine: Exploring the Case of the Seeress of Prevorst
  • Thick Description/Narrating the Execution of Charles I, 1649 (also offered in Fall 2019)
  • Finding Women’s Voices in the Archive
  • Turning Trial Records into History (also offered in Fall 2019)
  • Ephemera as Historical Objects
  • Narrative
  • Close Reading Primary Sources
  • From Topic to Archive/From Idea to Research
  • Emotions Research Group Discussion

Fall 2018

  • Social Network Analysis for Humanists, Part II: Digital Visualization of Social Networks
  • Social Network Analysis for Humanists, Part I: Social Networks Analysis
  • Finding Stories in the Archives (also offered in Fall 2019)

Summer 2020

  • Summer Interns’ Symposium
  • Mission Records as Method: Towards a Microhistory of Global China
    Eugenio Menegon (Associate Professor of History, Boston U)

Spring 2020

  • Monsters, Murder, and Mayhem in Microhistorical Analysis
    Jay M. Smith (Professor of History, UNC-Chapel Hill)
  • Microhistory of a Jewish Community
    Verena Kasper-Marienberg (Assistant Professor of History, NC State University)

Fall 2019

  • Talking Houses: Stories from a Small Hungarian Town
    Researchers at the Institute of Advanced Studies Kőszeg
  • Radicalism Between Race, Class and Generation: Conversation on the Social History of Modern Hungary
    Károly Halmos (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest)
  • Julius Szekfű and the Books of Ezekiel: Patriarch Joseph used as an Anti-Semitic Topos
    Károly Halmost (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest)
  • Meeting Capitalism in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Pest (Hungary)
  • What Undid Chinese State Medicine?
    Miriam Gross (Associate Professor of History, University of Oklahoma)
  • An Egyptian Sheikh’s Literary World: Digitally Reconstructing Islamic Print Culture Through Mustafa Salamah al-Najjari’s Book Collection
    Adam Mestyan (History) and Kathryn Schwartz (Assistant Professor of History, University of Massachusetts Amherst)
  • Forming Intimate Communities in Modern China
    Nicole Barnes (History)

Spring 2019

  • From Persecution to Revolution: A Jewish-Gentile Local Community in Budapest from 1938 to 1956”
    Erika Szívós (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest)
  • Making Love out of History: 19th-century pleasure gardens and modern romance fiction
    Theresa Romain (bestselling author)
  • Microhistory and The Revolt of Snowballs
    Claire Judde de Larivière (Université Toulouse II, Département d’histoire, Toulouse)
  • Cruise Ships, Cops, and the Black-Market Organ Trade: Researching real microworlds to write fiction
    Sonali Dev (USA Today bestselling author)
  • Working on Women’s Life Stories
    Laura Nenzi (University of Tennessee, Knoxville)

Spring 2020

  • "Black is the Root of Liberty:" Race, Class, and Liberation Theology in Nova Iguaçu, Brazil
    Travis Knoll (History)

Fall 2019

  • Catgut in God's Hands: The Maryknoll Sisters' Pusan Mission, 1950-1957
    Hannah Ontiveros (History)
  • The World’s Problems Are Your Own: Literacy, Development and the Sea
    Islands’ Cold War
    Aaron Colston (History)

Spring 2020

  • Getting What You Came For: Conferences And Why They Matter
  • Training Future Humanists: Critical Approaches to Undergraduate Teaching in History and Beyond

Fall 2019

  • Teaching Innovation in the MicroWorlds Lab
  • Graduate Student Grant Workshop

Spring 2019

  • Graduate Students Building Professional Networks